Old Barnsley – Bransley area map

Old Barnsley was to be found in the West Riding of Yorkshire until 1974 when it became part of the new county of South Yorkshire along with other towns and cities including Sheffield, Rotherham and Doncaster.  Barnsley featured in sheet 274 of the Ordnance Survey 6″ inch series of the West Riding of Yorkshire.  The table below gives a breakdown of the areas covered by the North and South Barnsley area maps.  Brief excerpts are also shown from the Kelly’s Directory of West Riding of Yorkshire 1881 to give a flavour and character of the area.

 

North Barnsley
1894
1907
1932
South Barnsley
1894
1907
1932

 

Area OS sheet Contains
North Barnsley Yorkshire 274 NE Barnsley town centre and Monk Bretton
South Barnsley Yorkshire 274 SE Barnsley town centre, Kendray and Worsborough

 

BARNSLEY is a municipal borough, thriving market and union town and railway station in the ancient parish of Silkstone, 24 miles South East from Bradford, 17 South East from Huddersfield, 24 South East from Halifax and 14 from Dewsbury, 19 South from Leeds, 10 south West from Wakefield, 15 north from Sheffield, 39 south-south west from York, and 177 from London by road. The distance of Barnsley by railway are – from London 187 miles, York 41, Sheffield 19 1/2, Manchester 34 3/4, Liverpool 66, Doncaster 17, Rugby 105, Newcastle 125, and Derby 56. The Lancashire and Yorkshire, and the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire, and Midland railways unite at this town: here is also a branch line (6 1/2 miles in length) to Penistone, uniting with the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire, and Huddersfield and Sheffield railways. At Cudworth, 3 ¼ miles East, is the station of the Midland line, from which is a branch line to this town called the Barnsley and Cudworth railway, in connection with Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire. Barnsley is a polling place for the southern division of the riding, in the union and petty sessional division of its own name, the division of Staincross wapentake, rural Deanery of Silkstone, archdeaconry of Craven, Diocese of Ripon and province of York. Town is situated on the declivity of a Hill, at the foot of which runs the river Dearne, and the Barnsley and Wakefield, and the Dearne and Dove canals.

The trade of the town has greatly increased since the commencement of the present century, when wire drawing (which was the ancient staple of the place) began to decline, and the manufacture of linen was introduced; during this period the population has increased more than fourfold, and the progress of manufacturing industry has largely developed the resources of the neighbourhood ; there are now many large mills in the town, in which from 800 to 1,000 power looms are employed in the manufacture of drills, diapers, damask, huckabacks, towellings, sheetings, and fancy vestings. Next to the linen trade, that of coal forms an important feature. Barnsley contains a bed of excellent coal, ten feet in thickness; several extensive collieries are constantly in active operation; there are also iron foundries, dyehouses, bleaching and print works, steam corn and saw mills, maltings and breweries.

The population in 1861 was 17,890, and in 1871 was 23,021 …

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