Old Scarborough – Scarborough area map

Old Scarborough was to be found in the North Riding of Yorkshire until 1974 when it became part of the new county of North Yorkshire along with other towns and cities including Harrogate, York, Northallerton and Knaresborough.  Scarborough featured in sheets 77, 78, 93 and 94 of the Ordnance Survey 6″ inch series of the North Riding of Yorkshire.  The table below gives a breakdown of the areas covered by the Scarborough area maps.  Brief excerpts are also shown from the Kelly’s Directory of North and East Riding of Yorkshire 1893 to give a flavour and character of the area.

 1938 Scarborough Special Edition map

1938 Scarborough map preview
1938 Scarborough map preview

Scarbourough Area Maps – 1895, 1914 and 1930

North West Scarborough
1895
1914
1930
North East Scarborough
1895
1919
1930
South West Scarborough
1895
1914
1929
South East Scarborough
1895
1914
1929
Area OS sheet Contains
North West Scarborough Yorkshire 77 SE Scarborough centre, Scalby, Falsgrave, Peasholm and Newby
North East Scarborough Yorkshire 78 SW Scarborough centre, North Bay and South Bay
South West Scarborough Yorkshire 230 SE East Ayton, Seamer and Irton
South East Scarborough Yorkshire 231 SW Cayton Bay, Osgodby, Wheatcroft and South Cliff

Scarborough is a fashionable watering place, a large, and well-built town, and municipal and parliamentary borough, and is also a parish and the head of a union and a county court district, in the Whitby division of the Riding, East Pickering Lythe petty sessional division, rural deanery of Scar borough, archdeaconry of the East Riding and diocese of York, distant from London 231 miles by rail, Beverley 45 1/4, Bridlington 22 3/4, Driffield 34 1/2 north, Derby 130 1/2, Filey 9 1/2 north-west, Harrogate 6o 1/2, Hull 53 1/2, Knaresborough 59 1/2, Leeds 75 3/4, Liverpool 149, Malton 21, Sheffield 95 3/4, Thirsk 49 west, York 42 3/4 north-east. Scarborough is approached by the North Eastern Railway, which has a direct line from York via Malton and also communication with Filey, Bridlington, Driffield, Beverley and Hull; a line from Scarborough to Whitby, opened in 1885, completes the coast line northwards to Middlesbrough

The peculiar situation of the town on both sides of the promontory gives it the effect of two watering places in one, the portion occupying the south cliff being, however, by far the larger, most attractive and most fashionable: the sands on either side are extensive, and afford excellent bathing: there are pleasure steamers and boats of all kinds, and the amusements on shore, especially during the season, are as varied as they are abundant: the place is also much frequented on account of its spa, or mineral springs, discovered in 1620, and still maintaining a high reputation, and the air is singularly fine and bracing.

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