Old Hull

Old Hull was to be found in the East Riding of Yorkshire until 1974 when it became part of the new county of Humberside before being rightfully restored to God’s own county in April 1996 as as part of East Yorkshire which also included Beverley, Withernsea, Hornsea,  Goole, Howden, Driffield and Bridlington.  Hull featured in sheets 226 and 240 of the Ordnance Survey 6″ inch series of the East Riding of Yorkshire.  The table below gives a breakdown of the areas covered by the Hull area maps.  Brief excerpts are also shown from the Kelly’s Directory of Hull and Its Neighbourhood 1899 to give a flavour and character of the area.

Old Hull map 1929 – Special Edition

Hull Area Maps – 1911, 1929 and 1938

North West Hull
1911
1929
1938
North East Hull
1911
1928
1938
South West Hull
1911
1929
1938
South East Hull
1911
1929
1938
Area OS sheet Contains
North West Hull Yorkshire 226 NW Cottingham, Newland Park, Stepney and Cross Bridges
North East Hull Yorkshire 226 NE Sculcoates, Sutton-on-Hull, Stoneferry and Wilmington
South West Hull Yorkshire 240 SW Hull centre, East Ella, Anlaby Common, Beetonville and Hessle Common
South East Hull  Yorkshire 240 SE Hull centre, Marfleet and New Town

HULL, or more properly KINGSTON-UPON-HULL, is a large seaport and populous city, a parliamentary, municipal and county borough, and the head also of a suffragan bishopric, in the Howdenshire division of the East Riding of the county of York, is the head of a union and county court district, a shire by itself and port, on the river Hull, at the point where that river discharges its waters into the estuary of the Humber, 20 miles from the German Ocean at Spurn Point. On the east it is surrounded by a level tract of country known as the shire of Holderness, in the South Hunsley Beacon petty sessional division, rural deanery of Hull, archdeaconry of the East Riding and diocese of York. Hull is 173 1/2 miles, by way of ferry from New Holland, from King’s Cross station(Great Northern railway), and 242 1/2 from Euston square station (North Western), London, 30 3/4 from Bridlington, 40 1/2 east from Doncaster, 19 south from Driffield, 16 1/4 north from Great Grimsby, 53 1/2 from Sheffield, 41 1/2 south-east from York, 51 from Leeds, 119 1/2 from Liverpool, 45 1/2 from Lincoln, 90 1/2 from Manchester

Shipping at the port of Hull in 1897 to and from Foreign ports and British possessions: -Sailing and steam vessels entered 3,233, tonnage 2,278,875;  cleared 2,860, tonnage 1,862,107 … Fishing boats registered at the port in 1897: -Sailing boats 127, tonnage 9. 773; steam boats 260, tonnage 15,751; total boats 387, tonnage 25.524. Number of hands employed on fishing boats 2,079. The produce of the fisheries finds its way by means of steam cutters and the rail to the London and other markets. Steam cutters are constantly employed carrying fish from the various fleets to the London and other large markets

Shipbuilding is largely carried on and there are rope yards and sail lofts. The iron shipbuilding yards and those of Earle’s Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Limited, are very extensive. Among the other staple industries are cotton spinning, seed crushing and oil refining from linseed and rape-seed and the making of linseed cakes; the manufacture of sail-cloth and rope, washing blue, black lead oil, paint, colors, varnish, cement, glue, starch and paper. There are also several engineering, chemical and tar works, iron foundries and breweries, oil mills and dredging machinery factories, tanneries and machine band makers. Messrs. J. H. Fenner & Co. of Chapel lane, have very extensive works at Marfleet for the manufacture of leather machine belting, firehoses, and hydraulic leather and card clothing.

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